see through globe on rocks Photo by Louis Maniquet

How to respond to a world in crisis: Inner and Outer Transformation

Ymasumac Maranon
9 min readJun 4, 2020

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Oh Son of Spirit! Noble have I created thee, yet thou hast abased thyself. Rise then for that which thou was created. Bahá’u’lláh

Recently, my teenage daughter and I were in the hammock and she was feeling life was not fair. That’s not surprising for adolescents to ponder, and I also know this usually has a background story, so I asked her why. She said her white friends don’t have to worry about racism, about their father or brother being pulled over and getting hurt, and that doesn’t seem fair. She’s right, it’s not fair and yet, it’s not that they don’t have to worry about racism, they do, they may not know they do and that is dangerous.

For me life has been about transformation, since I was eight-years-old I began to consciously think about how to transform my life. It started with a dream.

My parents divorced when I was three and by the time I was eight, I had been shuttled back and forth between my mother and her New England, Anglo family and my Bolivian-Quechua Indian dad and his family in California. Neither had remarried, and both had strong roots with their brothers, sisters, aunts and uncles and so by default did we. To say it was confusing to be shuttled back and

forth between cultures is an understatement — it was traveling between worlds and worlds that in textbooks collided and crashed and in reality, often was not much different with meat and potatoes in one home and llajua con silpancho in another, saluda con un beso every time you see a family member and to hug only once when you first arrive and when you plan to leave town. Every ritual, family norm, cultural nuance, pitch in language, rhythm of movement, everything held a unique meaning to each culture and I found myself often in trouble for getting it wrong with one group or the other. And then suddenly we moved, to a very small town in southern Mexico, in the furthest tip of the state of Quintana Roo, an hour from the now famous Tulum — back then no one knew of its existence except for locals and the occasional lost European tourist. I too was completely lost and felt I would never be normal again.

I turned on the only person I could think of, my deceased eldest brother. Seems funny to say that, but my brother David had always been a…

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Ymasumac Maranon

A writer engaged in healing work - found a place in education — anxiously concerned with the needs of the age we live in! http://www.limitlesslearninglab.com/